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This Abelardo Morell limited-edition photograph is from his Camera Obscura series. When Morell first began experimenting with the camera obscura process in 1991 he would cover with black plastic all of the windows in the room where he was working, then cut a small hole into the wall to allow light into the room. The view of what lay beyond the room would be projected, inverted, onto its inner walls. In the subsequent two decades, Morell has pushed this ancient process by using color film, various lenses, and a prism to make the projection appear right side up.


Morell says of his camera obscura work, “Over time, this project has taken me from my living room to all sorts of interiors around the world. One of the satisfactions I get from making this imagery comes from my seeing the weird and yet natural marriage of the inside and outside.”


Abelardo Morell (born in Havana, 1948) earned his BFA from Bowdoin College in 1977 and his MFA from Yale University in 1981. He was a recipient of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship in 1993. He spent the majority of his career as a teacher at Massachusetts College of Art and Design, but resigned in 2010 so he could dedicate more time to his art. Morell lives in Boston.