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"To worship beauty for it's own sake is narrow, and one surely cannot derive from it that esthetic pleasure which comes from finding beauty in the commonest things."  Imogen Cunningham

Aperture is pleased to work in conjunction with the Imogen Cunningham Trust and make available this special limited-edition platinum photograph of one of the artist's most iconic images. Two Callas as featured in an issue of Aperture magazine dedicated to the artist's work in 1964 (Issue 11:4). Cunningham, one of the pre-eminent photographers of the twentieth century, lived through every phase of photographic art this side of a salt print. From her early work, which epitomized the soft-focus, painterly style of Pictorialism, Imogen led the way to photography's unique new vision, the Modernist movement. Her love of form and abstraction, and for the clear, revealing eye of the camera lens, gave her an extraordinary artistic vision that never faltered during a career that spanned more than seventy years.

Imogen Cunningham (born in Oregon) grew up in Washington, and received a degree in chemistry from The University of Washington in Seattle, a perfectly practical solution for a young photographer.  In 1910 Imogen opened a portrait studio in Seattle, an instant success, and closed it seven years later to dedicate herself to her responsibilities with her husband and twin sons. Her portraits of the flowers in her garden, made in the precious hours whle her boys were napping, have become some of her most recognized work. In 1932, Imogen's work was exhibited with that of Edward Weston, Sonya Noskowiak, and Consuelo Kanaga. Her friendship and collaboration with Edward Weston led to the forming of the purist movement, Group f/64, which insisted on sharply defined images and tonal gradation. She eventually divorced and settled in Berkeley, California, where she worked as a photographic artist to the end of her long life at age ninety-three. Her work is in public and private collections throughout the world.