Along Some Rivers

Photographs and Conversations

Essays by Robert Adams
Photographs by Robert Adams

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$24.95
5 1/2 x 8 1/4 inches 112 pages, 28 duotone images Hardcover 978-1-59711-004-4 Spring 2006
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Robert Adams has spent decades considering and documenting the landscape of the American West and how it has been altered, disturbed, or destroyed by the hand of man. Along Some Rivers provides another point of entry into Adams' careful consideration of photography and beyond. Twenty-eight unpublished landscapes and a collection of conversations (some previously unpublished) with writers and curators—William McEwan, Constance Sullivan, and Thomas Weski, among others (including a group of his students)—this publication offers the artist's thoughts on a number of his now legendary projects, including Cottonwoods and What We Bought. A discussion of his recent series chronicling the destruction of Oregon's great forests, Turning Back, takes us to the present moment. Together these photographs and conversations provide valuable insight into how this master photographer approaches the medium with an expert level of craft, great intelligence, modesty, and above all, a distinct sense of purpose.

Robert Adams (born Orange, New Jersey, 1937) is a major figure in New Topographics movement known for his photographs of the modern American West. A recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, two Guggenheim Fellowships, the Spectrum International Prize for Photography, and the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize, his many books include: From the Missouri West (1980), Beauty in Photography: Essays in Defense of Traditional Values (1981), Our Lives and Our Children (1983), Summer Nights, Walking (1985), Los Angeles Spring (1986), and Perfect Times, Perfect Places (1988). Adams's work has been widely exhibited, including in a major retrospective at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

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