Aperture: Photographs

ubsfeat
ubsfeat

Description: Aperture was originally conceived, in 1952, to promote the appreciation of the art of photography. At first it published just Aperture magazine, but in the mid 1960s the Foundation launched both its book program and a limited-edition print program, as part of and in support of its publishing activities—becoming the leading American photography publisher of its generation. This exhibition tells the story of the evolution of the Foundation, through a display of photographs from its print and fundraising programs made over a period of fifty years. In the process, it charts the evolution of photography itself. The need for…

Read More →

The Photographer’s Playdate
A day-long program of interactive activities

playdate1
playdate1

  Installation images from the Exploratorium in San Fransisco Description: In response to the publication The Photographer’s Playbook: 307 Assignments and Ideas, Aperture Foundation has designed a day-long program of interactive activities to engage your community in the playfulness of photography. Initially produced at Aperture Gallery in New York City and at the Exploratorium in San Francisco, The Photographer’s Playdate can be mounted as a community-based event by organizations ranging from small photography clubs to larger museums and art centers. The program is designed for the general public and suitable for all ages and abilities. This is the perfect opportunity for…

Read More →

James Mollison
Playground

feature_image
feature_image

Description: James Mollison’s exhibition, Playground, influenced by his own experiences being bullied in the schoolyard, gives us an international look at children at play. These photographs are from rich and poor schools with vastly different resource levels in countries including Bhutan, Bolivia, India, Israel, Italy, Japan, Jordan, Kenya, Nepal, Norway, Sierra Leone, the United Kingdom, and the U.S. The photographs are accompanied by extended captions that tell of the conditions specific to each school. Where some children are in classrooms so crowded that they need to climb over desks to move, others play in palace gardens. The comparison invites us…

Read More →

Mary Ellen Mark
Tiny: Streetwise Revisited

1
1

Print Ready Proposal Description: • Exhibition and publication build on Mary Ellen Mark’s signature project by including some of her most celebrated work as well as never-before-seen images up through 2014 • A deeply moving and personal story, spanning more than thirty years, of Tiny, who we see transform from a thirteen-year-old kid living on the streets of Seattle to a mother of ten • A rare examination of intergenerational poverty In 1983, Mary Ellen Mark first photographed her poignant document of a fiercely independent group of homeless and troubled youth who made their way on the streets of Seattle…

Read More →

The Open Road: Photography and the American Road Trip
Curated by David Campany and Denise Wolff

featured image
featured image

Photographs by Robert Frank, Ed Ruscha, Inge Morath, Garry Winogrand, Joel Meyerowitz, William Eggleston, Lee Friedlander, Jacob Holdt, Stephen Shore, Bernard Plossu, Victor Burgin, Joel Sternfeld, Alec Soth, Todd Hido, Ryan McGinley, Justine Kurland, and Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs Description: “What should happen at the end of a road trip? A return to the status quo? A revolutionary new beginning? A few minor adjustments to one’s outlook? Obviously it is not enough to drive West and arrive in the Promised Land . . .” —David Campany, “A Short History of the Long Road” After World War II, the American…

Read More →

The Chinese Photobook
Curated by Martin Parr and WassinkLundgren

featured_image
featured_image

Description: In the last decade there has been a major reappraisal of the role and status of the photobook within the history of photography. Revisionist histories have added enormously to our understanding of the medium’s culture, particularly in places that are often marginalized, such as Latin America and Africa. However, until now, only three Chinese photobooks have made it onto historians’ short lists. Yet China has a fascinating history of photobook publishing, and Aperture’s exhibition The Chinese Photobook will reveal for the first time the richness and diversity of this heritage. Divided into six historical sections, it will delight and…

Read More →

Matthew Pillsbury
City Stages

MP_020_dinosaur_coming_life
MP_020_dinosaur_coming_life

Description: City Stages offers a paean to the craft and visionary potential of large-format, black-and-white photography, as well as to the vibrancy of the cultural landscape at a transitional moment—a moment in which our very relationship to that landscape is increasingly mediated by omnipresent screens. Over the past decade, photographer Matthew Pillsbury has built several extensive bodies of work that deal with different facets of contemporary metropolitan life and the passage of time. Working with black-and-white 8-by-10 film and long exposures, Pillsbury captures a range of psychologically charged experiences in the urban environment, from isolation—as we’re tuned into the omnipresent screens…

Read More →

Richard Renaldi
Touching Strangers

-60
-60

Description: Since 2007, Richard Renaldi has been working on a series of photographs made by approaching and asking complete strangers to physically interact while posing together for a portrait. Working on the street with a large-format 8-by-10-inch view camera, Renaldi encounters the subjects for his photographs in towns and cities all over the United States. He pairs them up and invites them to pose together, intimately, in ways that people are often taught to reserve only for their close friends and loved ones. Renaldi creates spontaneous and fleeting relationships between strangers for the camera, often pushing his subjects beyond their…

Read More →

Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen
THE SOCHI PROJECT: An Atlas of War and Tourism in the Caucasus

Holiday resort
Holiday resort

Description: Rob Hornstra and Arnold van Bruggen have been working together since 2009 to tell the story of Sochi, Russia, site of the 2014 Winter Olympic Games. They have returned repeatedly to this region as committed practitioners of “slow journalism,” establishing a solid foundation of research on and engagement with this small yet incredibly complicated place before it finds itself in the glare of international media attention. As van Bruggen writes, “Never before have the Olympic Games been held in a region that contrasts more strongly with the glamour of the event than Sochi. Just twenty kilometers away is the…

Read More →