Posts from the ‘PBR’ Category

PhotoBook Lust

In putting together this issue, I reached out to a wide range of bibliophiles and artists and asked them to discuss their personal relationship with a specific photobook. I asked them not to approach this as a book review, but rather as a personal account of a photobook that had provoked (or still provokes) the feelings of lust, desire, or arousal. I was interested less in an intellectual engagement, and more in something that each person has been unaccountably drawn to: a book that has obsessed them, whose pages have been pored over, consumed, loved; a book that has been…

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Publisher’s Note: Lesley A. Martin

Dear PhotoBook Review Reader, You’ll find many of the following pages are guided by one particular idea as a loose organizational frame: the photobook and desire. For those of you who know guest editor Bruno Ceschel as the founder of Self Publish, Be Happy, a curatorial project committed to the celebration and study of the self-published photobook, you may also be aware of SPBH’s id-driven alter ego, Self Publish, Be Naughty, a series of monographs about love, lust, sex, and taboos. It is eclectically promiscuous in its approach to desire and, as is pointed out in The Photobook: A History,…

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Editor’s Note: Bruno Ceschel

I was sitting in my doctor’s waiting room with my mom like I did every Wednesday when I was ten years old—I had developed an allergy to house dust and was getting weekly injections as treatment. From among the publications piled up in the waiting room that afternoon, I picked up one about maritime activities. I remember it like it was yesterday: suddenly, flipping through the book’s pages, I noticed a feature about a yacht sailing in a tropical sea with a crew of teenage boys. In some of the photographs the boys were naked, and in one photo in…

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PhotoBook Lust:
Ed Templeton on 61 Pimlico

A web exclusive from PhotoBook Review 006, Ed Templeton remembers 61 Pimlico: The Secret Journal of Henry Hayler.

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Erik Kessels on Hans Eijkelboom

PBRV_138_P9180017_600
PBRV_138_P9180017_600

From the PhotoBook Review Issue 005, Erik Kessels celebrates an early work by Hans Eijeklboom.

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The Photobook Awards 2013 Summer Exhibition Schedule

Untitled-11
Untitled-11

Here’s where The PhotoBook Awards exhibition is headed in Summer/Fall 2014.

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The Fine Art of Making Things

In The Photobook Review 005, Guest Editor Darius Himes and Publisher Lesley Martin spoke to a handful of people who have collectively (and many, individually) spent decades working with artists to help manifest, in physical form, the ideal book that is in their imaginations. For ease of discussion, three micro-stages have been identified: the consideration of materials, preparation of files, and what happens (or goes wrong) on press, when the images are finally made real. Part C: Putting Ink on Paper The on-press experience Do you think it is critical for someone to oversee the printing to achieve a successful…

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The Fine Art of Making Things

In The Photobook Review 005, Guest Editor Darius Himes and Publisher Lesley Martin spoke to a handful of people who have collectively (and many, individually) spent decades working with artists to help manifest, in physical form, the ideal book that is in their imaginations. For ease of discussion, three micro-stages have been identified: the consideration of materials, preparation of files, and what happens (or goes wrong) on press, when the images are finally made real. Part B: Preparing Files/Separations Converting a photographic image into a digital file ready to print How important is the stage of creating properly prepared reproduction…

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The Fine Art of Making Things

For the moment, the photobook is definitively a physical object. Somewhere, somehow—whether printed and bound at a Chinese printer whose main business is cereal boxes or output on a bedroom ink-jet printer and hand-stitched by the artist— images need to be put on paper, collated together, and made available in multiple copies. A book must be produced. “Production” is the final stage in the long, at-times heart-wrenching process of bookmaking. And it is often where the rubber hits the proverbial road—will the delicate palette and tonal range of the original images survive the translation into a limited set of inks…

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